Abortion and the Undesirables

The solution to the "problem" of the poor and the undesirables seems to be to convince them to use birth control, and when that fails, provide them with easy access to abortion (preferably, government-funded).

Personhood Alliance - worldviews - eugenics

One of the arguments proposed by “pro-choice” advocates is that abortion prevents children from being born into the world who are unwanted. Since unwanted children are more apt to become criminals (so the theory goes), be subject to abuse, grow up in poverty, and be a burden to society, it’s good that they would never be born. Besides, abortion is also a solution to the world’s overpopulation problem, so better to have the wanted, healthy, and productive among those of us who get to be alive.

This is eugenics. It’s the Darwin-inspired idea that humans are only the sum of their DNA and their external circumstances, and that people of inferior genetics and circumstances should be eliminated to make way for a better society. Francis Galton, who coined the term eugenics (meaning, well-born) in 1883, initially promoted positive eugenics, which encouraged healthy people of above-average intelligence to have more children. But he and many others, including Margaret Sanger, would eventually champion negative eugenics, in which reproduction of the inferior classes and races was discouraged, coerced, and even forced.

Over the past 100 years in America, eugenicists have openly used several means to their utopian end: Forced sterilization, institutionalization, childbearing permits, government-funded “family planning” programs, prenatal genetic testing, and of course, abortion. More recent eugenic efforts come from the fertility industry, emerging biotechnologies, and the transhumanist movement. But in general, birth control and legalized abortion have been the most effective and efficient way to reduce undesirable populations (barring the work of Nazi Germany, which took its inspiration from the American Eugenics Movement). The solution to the “problem” of the poor and the undesirables seems to be to convince them to use birth control, and when that fails, provide them with easy access to abortion (preferably, government-funded). Planned Parenthood has taken this strategy to heart, putting the vast majority of their abortion facilities in inner city neighborhoods, which has contributed to the disproportionate number of abortions among Blacks and Hispanics.

But is there such a thing as an unwanted child? Isn’t every child wanted by someone? God certainly wants and loves every child He creates. And what about poverty and suffering—why is death the answer our society offers? Does a person’s wantedness change their value, their worth, or their right to be protected from being systematically killed?

The personhood movement is rising up right now with a resounding NO.

 

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