Recognizing Utilitarianism

Whatever sacrifice needs to be made to contribute positively to the greater good is morally acceptable, because the value of an individual lies not in his inherent worth as a person made in the image of God, but in his usefulness as part of the larger group.

Personhood Alliance - Utilitarianism

Scripture speaks at length about false prophets and about our ability to discern the spirits to see where they truly originate. Paul warns us about “deceitful workers who disguise themselves as apostles of Christ. “It’s no wonder,” he says, “for Satan himself masquerades as an angel of light” (2 Corinthians 11:13-14). Paul also reminds us that we are not at war against flesh and blood but against the forces of evil in the spirit realm (Ephesians 6:12). The Enemy uses the flesh to accomplish his work, and often, we can clearly see its rotten fruit. But as Paul notes, sometimes it’s disguised a something good—namely, a “greater good”—Utilitarianism.

Utilitarianism promotes connectedness, purpose, and altruism, but it rejects absolute truth. In this philosophy, morality does not come from God, but from the social usefulness of particular actions and the consequences produced from them. Actions are “right” to the degree that they promote the greatest good for the greatest number, and they are moral depending on the desirability of the outcome—how much happiness is increased and how much pain is reduced. In other words, the end justifies the means.

Whatever sacrifice needs to be made to contribute positively to the greater good is morally acceptable, because the value of an individual lies not in his inherent worth as a person made in the image of God, but in his usefulness as part of the larger group. Utilitarianism perverts free will and entices us emotionally with ideas of “fairness,” “equality,” and “progress.” But as a consequence, we are granted selective rights by government, which then rejects the inalienable human rights that come from our Creator.

And our value is shifted from being made in the image of God to being used for the good of the group.

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